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The Day the Angels Cried:
The Ethiopian Holocaust 1935-1941
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June 30, 2003 marked the
68th Anniversary of Emperor
Haile Selassie I's prophetic
appeal to the League of
Nations, in Geneva Switzerland
on June 30, 1936,
where he
made a prophetic appeal to the 52
member League of Nations (mother
of the UN)  to halt Mussolini's
unprovoked aggression and
systematic mass-extermination
campaign in Ethiopia (1935-1941).  
Standing at the podium, His Majesty
described  how the fascist's made
poison gas their main weapon of
choice, which they sprayed from
airplanes upon innocent Ethiopian
men, women and children far
removed from the
battlefield...poisong the air, water
and grazing grounds, killing both
man and best while turning Ethiopia
virtually into a desert.  Sadly, His
Majesty was betrayed by the 52
nations and his prophetic  appeal
"fell upon deaf ears."  Stepping
down from the podium,  His  Majesty
spoke the following prophetic words

"...you struck the match in Africa, but
Europe will burn,"
and , "it is us
today, but you tomorrow..."
and so it
was, almost three years to the day
these  events escallated into World
War II, and the rest is history:  at the
end of World War II, the allies found
that 10 million northern Europeans,
including 6 million Jews, had been
exterminated from 1933-1945 by
nazi Germans, the same as
Ethiopians had been exterminated
by fascist Italians from 1935-1941.

Though the Ethiopian Holocaust
occurred within the same
time-frame as the Northern
European Holocaust (Jewish
Holocaust 1933-1945), and was
also carried out with poison gas,
and was just as devastating, due to
historical bias, media bias, bigoty
racism and white supremacy, the
world knows more about the
holocaust in Europe than the one
that occurred  in Africa virtually
within the same time frame.
The 225th King of Kings, Lord of Lords,
Conquering Lion of Judah, Emperor Haile
Selassie I speaks to the Nations on June 30, 1936.
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